Menu



This post contains affiliate links. If you use these links to buy something we may earn a commission."As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases¨







8/27/2021

Easy to make Queso Fresco


Queso fresco is the quintessential embodiment of Mexican cheese. Spanish for “fresh cheese,” queso fresco is the most commonly used cheese in Mexican cooking.
Queso Fresco

Yes. It takes only three ingredients to make queso fresco and you likely have all of them in your house, right now. All you need is some milk, an acid like vinegar or lemon juice, and salt. That’s it!



Queso fresco is normally crumbled on top of food—enchiladas or tostadas, for instance. It’s also used in Mexican tapas, called botanas.

Queso Fresco




What's in Queso Fresco?

Milk - Whole Milk (not ultra-pasteurized). Milk that has been ultra-pasteurized does not work well in cheesemaking because the proteins have been destabilized. As a result, the calcium in the milk does not bond properly to make a good curd.

Acid source - Lemon juice, lime juice, or white vinegar are all great for making queso fresco. All will cause your cheese curds to separate from the whey.

Salt - Non-iodized salt, sea salt, or kosher salt

My Latest Video





How to Make Queso Fresco

Tools needed
  • Slotted spoon
  • Instant-read thermometer
  • Heavy bottom pot 
  • Cheesecloth
  • Colander
  • Metal Strainer



  • Prepare colander with 4 layers of cheesecloth, or flour sack towel. 





  • Heat the milk to between 165° - 180° F in a heavy bottom pot, remove from the heat when you reach temperature.

  • Slowly stir in lemon juice. The milk should immediately separate into curds and whey. If not, add more lemon juice one tablespoon at a time until the separation occurs. Let set up to 20 minutes
  • Use a slotted spoon or wire skimmer.


  • Transfer curds to a prepared colander add salt and mix thoroughly.



  • When most of the whey has drained off and the cheese is cool enough to handle, lift the edges of the cheesecloth up and twist, wrapping the cheese securely inside the cheesecloth. Carefully squeeze off excess whey.


    Place the cheesecloth-wrapped cheese back in the colander and place a heavy can or pan on top. Let sit until cheese has reached desired texture, about an hour and a half.
    Stores for 1 week in the refrigerator



    Uses for Queso Fresco
  • Toss it into a salad. 
  • Use it as a garnish for soup. It works beautifully atop a cold summer soup, like gazpacho, or warmer varieties, like tortilla soup and black bean soup.
  • Top tacos and tostadas with queso fresco.



  • Variations of Queso Fresco
    Smoky taste - Add 1 tablespoon of chipotle chilies in adobo sauce, finely diced when adding salt. 
    Spiciness - Add finely diced jalapeños and cilantro

    Follow us for more Delicious Recipes!

    Subscribe to my Newsletter, follow me on Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram for all my latest recipes.




    Queso Fresco



    Spanish for “fresh cheese,” queso fresco is the most commonly used cheese in Mexican cooking.

    Ingredients:
    • 1-gallon milk
    • 1/2 cup lemon juice
    • 2 teaspoon sea salt or non-iodized salt
    • Supplies
    • Cheesecloth
    • Metal strainer
    Instructions:
    1. Prepare colander with 4 layers of cheesecloth
    2. Heat the milk to between 165° - 180° F in a heavy bottom pot, remove from the heat when you reach temperature.
    3. Slowly stir in lemon juice. The milk should immediately separate into curds and whey. If not, add more lemon juice one tablespoon at a time until the separation occurs. Let set up to 20 minutes
    4. Using a slotted spoon or wire skimmer, transfer curds to a prepared colander, add salt and mix thoroughly.
    5. When most of the whey has drained off and the cheese is cool enough to handle, lift the edges of the cheesecloth up and twist, wrapping the cheese securely inside the cheesecloth. Squeeze off excess whey.
    6. Place the cheesecloth-wrapped cheese back in the colander and place a heavy can or pan on top. Let sit until cheese has reached desired texture, about an hour and a half.


    No comments:

    Post a Comment

    We Recommend




    How to Store Cilantro








    Follow Us

    Follow